Privacy Concerns with Lyft

 Privacy Concerns with Lyft

Lyft may have become a giant riding service, but its illegal acts contradict what we expect from them. For instance, Lyft will lure you into giving them your data, but they will not want to let go of the data once you exit the service. This act has seen many users suffer from the contradiction created between recycled numbers and verifications and new accounts created as ArsTechnica reports. In this article, we will not only list the reasons why you should not use Lyft, but we also offer you proof of our claims.

Lyft lets its employees access customer data

After worried customers had raised concerns, Lyft issued a statement to The Information about its ongoing investigations that its employees illegally accessed user data. The illegal practice which was reportedly leaked by an anonymous person claimed that the alleged employees used customer information to track where the users ordered their rides from. The anonymous person also reported that one particular employee had bragged openly about discovering the personal cell line of Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg. The anonymous tipper continued to say that other employees had used Lyft records to access information of Hollywood actors and actresses.

Lyft is always under cyberattacks

Two months ago, an incident was reported about a Lyft client whose account was supposedly hacked and later billed without his consent. The user who claimed to have used the account only twice was so shocked and threatened by unknown texts and voicemails from an anonymous Lyft driver, and later emails about the penalties he could incur for canceling rides. The case which was later passed to Lyft’s insurance company was ignored, and the customer was billed forcefully. In May 2015, a report was published about allegations of Uber against its competitor Lyft for aiding in its biggest data breach. According to the report, Lyft’s involvement was confirmed through a public key which was posted on GitHub by a Lyft employee. The incident led us to believe that Lyft is always willing to compromise your user data if it benefits them.

Lyft will compromise your privacy, and there’s nothing you can do

In 2016, CSO reported a shocking incident about how Lyft stores your information even after you close your Lyft account. According to the report, a user had closed her account, and later re-opened another after registering a new account. Her old cell line was unknowingly used by a new Lyft customer, who had been issued the old, yet recycled line. The Lyft user was later billed – from his already integrated personal details of the new user. In the same year, ArsTechnica also reported the occurrence of similar incidents of the possible contradiction of verification of old-recycled lines.

Elsewhere, a Norton blog also cited the risk of letting companies like Lyft collecting your personal data. In their article, they warned that Lyft would collect your data, and because Lyft lacks a good verification system, it will share your data with affiliate sites for verification. Moreover, Lyft will also use your GPS location to track your online activities year-around without your knowledge.

Lyft underpays its drivers

Citing an MIT CEEPR report published, an MIT student discovered that driving for Lyft really ‘sucks.’ During his study, the student discovered that big companies like Lyft are used to evading tax payment thereby making significant profits, and ending up not paying their drivers well. The researchers also discovered that profit collected by drivers to be extremely low. The company’s median profit was estimated at $3.37 per hour – of those, 74% of Lyft drivers were earning less than the minimum wage. Further, in the study, we discovered that all drivers earned an average of $0.59 per mile, but will incur costs of up to $0.30 per mile.

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